GABA Telepesychiatry
Psychiatry visits made easy

office visits also available on request

See your Psychiatrist from the privacy of your home or office

           all you need is a computer and an internet access

Book Online now or call 1800-222-GABA…

About GABA Tele- psychiatry

RESPECT = responsible , effective , safe, private , ethical , convenient, treatments

Responsive

100%

Effective

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safe

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private

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ethical

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convenient

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Our Mission

Now you can see your US qualified licensed & licensed Psychiatrist from anywhere in the world via our encrypted video platform.

All affiliated practitioners are US licensed , trained, and insured psychiatrists , who are screened, verified, and are known to follow US psychiatry guidelines and standards of care .

Our goal is to provide the highest quality care to patients, who otherwise would not be able to access care from the provider of their choice either because of geographic location or scheduling difficulty .

How are we different

We provide services through a HIPPA complaint video platform, as if you were in the office. We do not treat patients via phone or text message.

We follow the same practices, guidelines as an in office visit, achieving the same results and safety standards. We are not a ‘text your therapist,’ or ‘therapy on demand app.

Our peer network offers peer guidance and supervision, and we offer comprehensive services with medication management , psychotherapy modalities, as well as screening for medical causes of illness.

Do I need to see a psychiatrist?

Most Americans are unaware that their psychiatric symptoms are treatable and continue to suffer in silence, despite prolonged suffering or disability.

Most Americans are unaware that their symptoms are treatable

Why seek treatment  ?

Millions of Americans suffer through no fault of their own despite having access to care. The result of which is that people suffer from poor work performance, relationship problems, marital discord, health problems due in inability to care for themselves. Most people are motivated to  receive treatment and find that their symptoms has already improved with a combination of medication,psychotherapy & close medical management. Even if a partial resolution in symptoms can lead to a dramatic improvement in quality of life and reduction in suffering.

Common symptoms include :

anxiety, depression, dysthymia, irritability, loos of enjoyment in activities, fatigue, poor attention, and poor concentration, anger, guilty feelings, social phobia, panic attacks, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety, obsessive thought, compulsions, insomnia, sleeping too much , early morning waking, excessive drinking, binge eating, loss of appetite, anorexia, paranoid feelings, hearing voices, seeing things, feelings of confusion . Excessive premenstrual dysfunction.


ONSET:
Early adulthood and with a variety of contexts                          

A.  Presence of obsessions, compulsions, or both
Obsessions:
1. Recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or images that are intrusive and unwanted and that cause anxiety or distress
2.Attempts to ignore or suppress such thoughts, urges, or images or to neutralize them
Compulsions:
1. Repetitive behaviors or mental acts that you feel driven to do in response to an obsession or rules
2. Aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress or preventing some dreaded event or situation
B. o/c are time consuming or cause distress or impairment
Specifiers: With good/fail insight, With poor insight, With absent insight/delusional beliefs, Tic-related
Differential Diagnosis: GAD, BDD, Hoarding Disorder, Trichomania, Illness Anxiety Disorder, Eating disorder, ADHD, MDD, ASD

A. A predominant complaint of dissatisfaction witli sleep quantity or quality, associated with one (or more) of the following symptoms: 1. Difficulty initiating sleep. (In children, this may manifest as difficulty initiating sleep without caregiver intervention.)
2. Difficulty maintaining sleep, characterized by frequent awakenings or problems returning to sleep after awakenings. (In children, this may manifest as difficulty returning to sleep without caregiver intervention.)
3. Early-morning awakening with inability to return to sleep.
B. The sleep disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, educational, academic, behavioral, or other important areas of functioning.
C. The sleep difficulty occurs at least 3 nights per week.
D. The sleep difficulty is present for at least 3 months.
E. The sleep difficulty occurs despite adequate opportunity for sleep.
F. The insomnia is not better explained by and does not occur exclusively during the course of another sleep-wake disorder (e.g., narcolepsy, a breathing-related sleep disorder, a circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder, a parasomnia).
G. The insomnia is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication). H. Coexisting mental disorders and medical conditions do not adequately explain the predominant complaint of insomnia.

Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation resulting in the loss of ovarian follicle development. It is considered to occur when 12 menstrual cycles are missed.Menopausal transition, or perimenopause, is the period between the onset of irregular menstrual cycles and the last menstrual period. This period is marked by fluctuations in reproductive hormones 3 and is characterized by the following:

  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Prolonged and heavy menstruation intermixed with episodes of amenorrhea
  • Decreased fertility
  • Vasomotor symptoms
  • Insomnia

Some of these symptoms may emerge 4 years before menses cease, with a perimenopausal mean age of onset of 47.5 years.During the menopausal transition, estrogen levels decline and levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) increase.
Postmenopause is the phase following the last menstrual period.

A. In the majority of menstrual cycles, at least five symptoms must be present in the final week before the onset of menses, start to improve within a few days after the onset of menses, and become minimal or absent in the week postmenses.
B.  One (or more) of the following symptoms must be present:
1. Marked affective lability (e.g., mood swings: feeling suddenly sad or tearful, or increased sensitivity to rejection).
2. Marked irritability or anger or increased interpersonal conflicts.
3. Marked depressed mood, feelings of hopelessness, or self-deprecating thoughts.
4. Marked anxiety, tension, and/or feelings of being keyed up or on edge.
C.  One (or more) of the following symptoms must additionally be present, to reach a total of five symptoms when combined with symptoms from Criterion B above.
1. Decreased interest in usual activities (e.g., work, school, friends, hobbies).
2. Subjective difficulty in concentration.
3. Lethargy, easy fatigability, or marked lack of energy.
4. Marked change in appetite; overeating; or specific food cravings.
5. Hypersomnia or insomnia.
6. A sense of being ovenwhelmed or out of control.
7. Physical symptoms such as breast tenderness or swelling, joint or muscle pain, a sensation of “bloating,” or weight gain. Note: The symptoms in Criteria A-C must have been met for most menstrual cycles that occurred in the preceding year.
D. The symptoms are associated with clinically significant distress or interference with work, school, usual social activities, or relationships with others (e.g., avoidance of social activities; decreased productivity and efficiency at work, school, or home).
E. The disturbance is not merely an exacerbation of the symptoms of another disorder, such as major depressive disorder, panic disorder, persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia), or a personality disorder (although it may co-occur with any of these disorders).
F. Criterion A should be confirmed by prospective daily ratings during at least two symptomatic cycles. (Note: The diagnosis may be made provisionally prior to this confirmation.)
G. The symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication, other treatment) or another medical condition (e.g., hyperthyroidism).

Cyclothymia (Thyroid Disorders)
A. At least 2 years numerous periods of hypomanic sx that don’t meet criteria for episode and numerous periods with depressive sx that don’t meet criteria for episode
B. Present at least half the time and not been without for more than 2 months at a time
C.  Criteria for MD, manic, or hypomanic episode never met.
Specifiers: with anxious distressComorbidity of diabetes and psychiatric disorders can present in different patterns. First, the two can present as independent conditions with no apparent direct connection. In such a scenario both are outcome of independent and parallel pathogenic pathways. Second, the course of diabetes can be complicated by emergence of psychiatric disorders. In such cases diabetes contributes to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Various biological and psychological factors mediate the emergence of psychiatric disorders in such context. Third, certain psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia act as significant independent risk factors for development of diabetes. Fourth, there could be an overlap between the clinical presentation of hypoglycemic and ketoacidosis episodes and conditions such as panic attacks. Fifth, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes could emerge as a side effect of the medications used for psychiatric disorders. Treatment of psychiatric disorders could influence diabetes care in other ways also as discussed in subsequent sections
A. Restriction of energy intake relative to requirements, leading to a significantly low body weight in the context of age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health.
B.  Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat or persistent behavior that interferes with weight gain, even thought at a significantly low weight.
C. Disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight
coding: restricting type, binge-eating/purging type
Bulimia Nervosa
A. recurrent episodes of binge eating. characterized by both:
1. eating, in a discrete period of time an amount of food that is definitely larger than what most individuals would eat in a similar period of time under similar circumstances
2. sense of lack of control over eating during the episode
B. recurrent inappropriate compensatory behaviors in order to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or other medications; fasting or excessive exercise
C.  the binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors both occur, on average, at least once a week for 3 months
D.  self-evaluation is unduly influenced by body shape and weight
E.  the disturbance does not occur exclusively during episodes of Anorexia Nervosa
A. recurrent unexpected panic attacks. Abrupt surge of intense fear or intense discomfort that reaches a peak within minutes and has 4+:
1. palpitations, pounding heart, or accelerated heart rate
2. sweating
3. trembling or shaking
4. sensations of shortness of breath or smothering
5. feelings of choking
6. chest pain or discomfort
7. nausea or abdominal distress
8. chills or heat sensations
9. paresthesias (numbness or tingling)
10. derealization or depersonalization
12. fear of losing control or going crazy
13. fear of dying
B.  at least one of the attacks followed by a month of 1. persistent concern or worry about additional panic attacks
2. significant maladaptive change in behavior related to the attacks and designed to avoid having panic attacks
C.  not due to substance or medical condition
D.  not better explained by another mental disorder

Mood Disorder Due to a General Medical Condition is a mood disorder due to direct physiological conditions.
ONSET:
After or during a General Medical Condition:

Sexual dysfunctions include:

delayed ejaculation, erectile disorder, female orgasmic disorder, female sexual interest/arousal disorder, genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder, male hypoactive sexual desire disorder, premature (early) ejaculation, substance/medicationinduced sexual dysfunction, other specified sexual dysfunction, and unspecified sexual dysfunction.

Sexual dysfunctions are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are typically characterized by a clinically significant disturbance in a person’s ability to respond sexually or to experience sexual pleasure. An individual may have several sexual dysfunctions at the same time. In such cases, all of the dysfunctions should be diagnosed


A. 2+ for 1 month (1, 2, or 3)
1. Delusions
2. Hallucinations
3. Disorganized speech
4. Grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior
5. Negative symptoms
B. Level of fx in one or more major life areas is below premorbid level.
C. Continuous signs of disturbance for 6 months (must include 1 month of criterion A symptoms, may include prodromal or residual phases)
Specifiers: First episode/acute, partial remission, full remission, Multiple edisodes/acute, partial remission, full remission, With catatonia
Differential Diagnosis: Schizoaffective disorder, Depressive/Bipolar with psychotic features, Substance abuse, Medical condition, Autis Spectrum/Communication Disorder (Additional diagnosis of Schizophrenia only made if prominent delusions or hallucinations are present for 1 month)

Bipolar I Disorder
A. Meet criteria for a manic episode. Manic episode may or may not have been preceded by or followed by a hypomanic or major depressive episode.
B. Not better explained by schizoaffective disorder, any other psychotic disorder
Specifiers:
with anxious distress, with mixed features, with rapid cycling, with melancholic features, with atypical features, with mood-(in)congruent psychotic features, with catatonia, with peripartum onset, with seasonal pattern.
Bipolar II Disorder
A. Current or past hypomanic episode and a current or past major depressive episode
B. Never had a manic episode
C. Not better explained by psychotic disorder
D. Symptoms of depression or unpredictability of alteration between periods of depression and hypomania causes distress or impairement
Specifiers:
anxious distress, mixed features, rapid cycling, melancholic features, atypical features, mood-(in)congruent psychotic features, catatonia, peripartum onset, seasonal pattern, partial/full remission, Mild/moderate/severe

A. 5+ of the following during the same 2 week period and represent a change in fx (at least 1 = 1 or 2)
1. depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day
2. markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities
3. significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain or decrease/increase in appetite
4. insomnia or hypersomnia
5. psychomotor agitation or retardation
6. fatigue or loss of energy
7. feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt
8. diminished ability to think or concentrate or indecisiveness
9. recurrent thoughts of death, recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan
B. Causes distress or impairment
C. Not due to a substance or medical condition

A. Depressed mood for most of the day, for more days than not, as indicated by either subjective account or observation by others, for at least 2 years. Note: In children and adolescents, mood can be irritable and duration must be at least 1 year.
B. Presence, while depressed, of two (or more) of the following:

  1. Poor appetite or overeating.
  2. Insomnia or hypersomnia.
  3. Low energy or fatigue.
  4. Low self-esteem.
  5. Poor concentration or difficulty making decisions.
  6. Feelings of hopelessness.

C. During the 2-year period (1 year for children or adolescents) of the disturbance, the individual has never been without the symptoms in Criteria A and B for more than 2 months at a time.
D. Criteria for a major depressive disorder may be continuously present for 2 years.
E. There has never been a manic episode or a hypomanie episode, and criteria have never been met for cyclothymic disorder.
F. The disturbance is not better explained by a persistent schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, delusional disorder, or other specified or unspecified schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorder.
G.The symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or another medical condition (e.g. hypothyroidism).
H. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder
A. Excessive anxiety or worry occurring more days than not for 6+ mos
B. Difficulty controlling worry
C. 3+ Sx:
1. Restlessness or feeling keyed up or on edge
2. Being easily faigued
3. Difficulty concentrating or mind going blank
4. Irritability
5. Muscle tension
6. Sleep disturbance
D. Distress or impairment
Differential Diagnosis: PD, SAD, OCD, PTSD, Anorexia Nervosa, Somatic Symptom Disorder, BDD, Illness Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Delusional Disorder
A.  Marked fear or anxiety about 2+:
1. Using public transportation
2. Being in open spaces
3. Being in enclosed spaces
4. Standing in line or being in a crowd
5. Being outside of the home alone
B.  Avoids these situations because of thoughts that escape might be difficult or help might not be available in the event of developing panic-like symptoms
C.  Situations almost always provoke fear or anxiety
D.  Actively avoiding situations that produce anxiety
E.  Out of proportion to actual danger posed
F.  Persistent Sx for 6+ months
G.  Distress and impairment
Differential Diagnosis: SP, OCD, BDD, SAD
Generalized Anxiety Disorder
A.  Excessive anxiety or worry occurring more days than not for 6+ mos
B.  Difficulty controlling worry
C.  3+ Sx:
1. Restlessness or feeling keyed up or on edge
2. Being easily faigued
3. Difficulty concentrating or mind going blank
4. Irritability
5. Muscle tension
6. Sleep disturbance
D.  Distress or impairment
Differential Diagnosis: PD, SAD, OCD, PTSD, Anorexia Nervosa, Somatic Symptom Disorder, BDD, Illness Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Delusional Disorder.
 A.  Pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others, occurring since age 15 and indicated by 3+:
1. Failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors, as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest
2. Deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning other for personal profit or pleasure
3. Impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
4. Irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults
5. Reckless disregard for safety of self or others
6. Consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations
7. Lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another
B.  At least 18 years old
C.  Evidence of conduct disorder with onset before 15
D.  Not exclusively during course of schizophrenia or bipolar
A.  Evidence of significant cognitive decline from a previous level of performance in one or more cognitive domains*:
– Learning and memory
– Language
– Executive function
– Complex attention
– Perceptual-motor
B.  The cognitive deficits interfere with independence in everyday activities. At a minimum, assistance should be required with complex instrumental activities of daily living, such as paying bills or managing medications.Social cognition
C.  The cognitive deficits do not occur exclusively in the context of a delirium
D.  The cognitive deficits are not better explained by another mental disorder (eg, major depressive disorder, schizophrenia)

A. In the majority of menstrual cycles, at least five symptoms must be present in the final week before the onset of menses, start to improve within a few days after the onset of menses, and become minimal or absent in the week postmenses.
B. One (or more) of the following symptoms must be present:
1. Marked affective lability (e.g., mood swings: feeling suddenly sad or tearful, or increased sensitivity to rejection).
2. Marked irritability or anger or increased interpersonal conflicts.
3. Marked depressed mood, feelings of hopelessness, or self-deprecating thoughts.
4. Marked anxiety, tension, and/or feelings of being keyed up or on edge.
C. One (or more) of the following symptoms must additionally be present, to reach a total of five symptoms when combined with symptoms from Criterion B above.
1. Decreased interest in usual activities (e.g., work, school, friends, hobbies).
2. Subjective difficulty in concentration.
3. Lethargy, easy fatigability, or marked lack of energy.
4. Marked change in appetite; overeating; or specific food cravings.
5. Hypersomnia or insomnia.
6. A sense of being ovenwhelmed or out of control.
7. Physical symptoms such as breast tenderness or swelling, joint or muscle pain, a sensation of “bloating,” or weight gain. Note: The symptoms in Criteria A-C must have been met for most menstrual cycles that occurred in the preceding year.
D. The symptoms are associated with clinically significant distress or interference with work, school, usual social activities, or relationships with others (e.g., avoidance of social activities; decreased productivity and efficiency at work, school, or home).
E. The disturbance is not merely an exacerbation of the symptoms of another disorder, such as major depressive disorder, panic disorder, persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia), or a personality disorder (although it may co-occur with any of these disorders).
F. Criterion A should be confirmed by prospective daily ratings during at least two symptomatic cycles. (Note: The diagnosis may be made provisionally prior to this confirmation.) G. The symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication, other treatment) or another medical condition (e.g., hyperthyroidism).

WHY GABA Telepsychiatry?

Dedicated Providers
US trained licensed & insured Psychiatrists
Follow APA guidelines and standards of care
Medication management combined with psychotherapy
Multiple psychotherapy modalities
Peer supervision network ensure safety and high standards
Screening for medical causes of psychiatric illness
Endocrine & Nutritional evaluation
Safe Hippa Compliant Video Platform
Online scheduling available
Patient data stored in secure encrypted cloud based EHR
Prescriptions and lab send directly to your pharmacy
Medications mailed to your location
Your dedicated staff member to assist your through the process
No rescheduling charges
We make it easy

Our Psychiatric Services

Your GABA Telepsychiatry Visit

A GABA tele-psychiatry staff member will be assigned to you to help you fill in the online questionnaire and liaise with your primary care doctor.

You will see the Psychychiatrist for a comprehensive evaluation.

Step 1 – Your Intake

You will fill in our online intake forms. If you’re having difficulty filling in our questionnaire online, you may ask to be connected to a staff member either by phone or via our secure teleplatform and he or he will help you fill in your paperwork. We will connect you to our video platform.

Your Medical Records

We will collect your medical records from your primary care provider. If you do not have a primary care provider, we will help you connect to a local provider or urgent care franchise, (if you are traveling) which will accept your insurance.

Your Dedicated Liaison

Your dedicated staff member with help you navigate the process of scheduling, filling in of intake forms, payment, obtaining prescriptions, bloodworms & medical records.


Step 2 – Psychiatric History & Evaluation

You will see a psychiatrist via a telepsychiatry platform for your evaluation. To get the most out of your visit, try to make sure you are in a private room without any background noise, an adequate speed internet connection and a backup phone should there be any interruption to your internet service.

You will see the psychiatrist

The psychiatrist will ask about your current and past symptoms, including your family, developmental, occupational, relationship history, psychiatric & medical history as well as your personality style and coping strategies.

Your Treatment Plan

Your medical and psychiatric symptoms, history, responses to medications psychotherapy and other treatment will be used to formulate a treatment plan.


Your Medical/ Nutrition Evaluation

Medical evaluation will include nutrition and hormonal factors affecting mood as well as screening for underlying medial problems causing mood distrurbance.

If you are traveling we can help and connect you to a local urgent care center of primary care doctor in your area.

Step 3 Medical Evaluation

We have a policy to screen possible medical causes of psychiatric illness. This includes :

lab work for thyroid function, sex hormones including estrogen, progesterone and testosterone levels, heavy metal toxicity including lead and mercury levels. We also screen anemia, vitamin D , vitamin B12 & iodine deficiency.

We also screen for symptoms of sleep apnea, insomnia, diabetes and other factors which may be exacerbating psychiatric symptoms. We will send a prescription to your local quest diagnostics where you can go for blood works. Otherwise you can see your primary care provider for blood work. We will follow up on your medical records


Step 4 –  Nutrition Evaluation

There will be an optional nutritional evaluation where you will be asked to keep a food diary :

 We do not prescribe expensive supplements. Most patients rarely need to take anything more than omega 3, multivitamins, which can either be bought over the counter at your local pharmacy or may be covered by your insurance.

We may prescribe extra supplements if there is a specific deficiency e.g. iron or folate, vitamin D or thiamine- depending on the deficiency.We also monitor correct control of diabetes, factors in your diet which may be causing fluctuations in blood sugar and factors affecting your mood and anxiety levels. This is all part of the initial evaluation.


Book Online now or call 1800-222-GABA…

Your Treatment plan evaluation

Causes of Psychiatric symptoms

  • Genetic
  • Developmental
  • Medical illness
  • endocrine / hormones
  • nutritional deficiency
  • defenses / coping strategies
  • relationship stressors
  • occupational
  • addiction
  • sleep disorders

Causes of Treatment Failure

  • Incomplete evaluation
  • wrong diagnosis
  • psychodynamic causes
  • medical /endocrine / nutritional
  • poor compliance
  • wrong medication
  • inadequate medication dosing
  • drug- drug / drug- food interactions
  • genetic/ idiopathic

Your Treatment plan

Your Treatment plan may consist of the following features

 

  1. Screening for causes of symptoms
  2. Education and information
  3. Treating medical/ nutritional endocrine causes of symptoms e.g. sleep apnea
  4. Lifestyle changes  e.g. exercise, diet, sleep hygiene
  5. Choosing the correct therapy modality if desired / recommended
  6. Selecting the correct medication regime if required
  7. Careful monitoring and titration

Book Online now or call 1800-222-GABA…

Will I need to take medication ?

If you are having persistent symptoms of anxiety, insomnia, depression, chronic fatigue, hyperphagia, anorexia, obsessions, compulsions, low sex drive, apathy, mood swings, severe premenstrual symptoms with polycystic ovarian syndrome, paranoid delusions, hallucinations, voices, low energy, seasonal affective symptoms, irritability or anger despite all efforts at natural treatment and is suffering from poor work performance and impairment in social relationships– you may need to take medication in order to live your life to the fullest and achieve your personal and professional goals.



I took medication before & it didn’t work .

Reasons for poor response to medication include :

  • Inadequate trial of medication (not finding the correct medication )
  • Inadequate dosing
  • Drug , drug interations
  • Poor compliance
  • Nutritional Deficiencies
  • Vitamin D deficency
  • Endocrine Problems : including PCOS, menopause, subclinical hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism
  • Sleep problems including sleep apnea
  • Developmental, Past Trauma, PTSD
  • Unresolved external stressors
  • Genetic
  • wrong diagnosis
  • wrong medication

Learn More



I have had side effects to Psychiatric medications BEFORE.

Reasons for side effects to psychiatric medications can be :

  • Ideopathic
  • Slow enzyme metobalizer
  • Drug/drug interations
  • Drug/food interactions
  • High Dose

Ways to avoid side effects include :

  • Discontinue the offending agent
  • Screen for family history of drug interactions.
  • Screen for possible drug/drug interaction
  • Slow titration
  • screen for food /drug interactions

Learn More



I only want Psychotherapy and Natural Remedies

Research has shown that supportive psychotherapy & cognitive behavioral therapy creates similar changes in the frontal lobe on PET scan as SSRIs. Many patients with symptoms of depression, anxiety, PTSD and mild OCD improve with psychotherapy alone.
Natural treatments for depression, anxiety, OCD,  include :

  • sunlight
  • exercise
  • n-acetylcysteine
  • nutritional supplementation
  • screening for heavy metal toxicity
  • treat subclinical hypo&hyperthyroidism
  • progesterone
  • psychotherapy

Learn More


th-5

What if I don’t want to take medication ?

No one can force you to take medication if you do not want to, unless you are in the hospital and often not even there!
At GABA Telepsychiatry, we work with you to address all the possible causes of psychiatric symptoms including: developmental, genetic, emotional, trauma, environmental, endocrine (due to hormones); medical including sleep apnea, diabetes, stroke, obesity, poor exercise and physical fitness and the medical causes of psychiatric symptoms.
However, there are some individuals who still demonstrate significant impairment, who continue to suffer and are still symptomatic despite psychotherapy and efforts towards natural remedies. In these cases, we aim to work with you to find the correct medication and minimize side effects.


Did you know that the most common causes of poor response to psychiatric medication are poor compliance, inadequate dosing, and inadequate trial of medication.

About Tele- psychiatry

Tele – psychiatry is expanding globally due to convinience & good outcomes

How is Telepsychiatry different from an office visit?

Tele-psychiatry is exactly the same as an in office visit. Exactly the same rules, regulations and standards of care apply. Psychiatrists must be licensed, insured and certified in the State where they are practicing. They must follow APA guideline sand standards of care.

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Is tele- psychiatry safe ?

Tele-psychiatry is as safe & private as an office visit if practiced correctly: Psychiatrists must see patients via an encrypted hippa complaint platform. Notes must be stored on secure cloud based Electronic Health Records software. The same data security rules apply fro Telehealth .

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Is tele- psychiatry effective ?

There is an increasing amount of research demonstrating tele-psychiatry to be as effective  as in office visits and in some cases more effective. Reasons for high efficacy of tele-psychiatry include patient having a greater choice in provider or specialist treatment with less geographic limitation and higher compliance rates due to easier access to appointments
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Is tele psychiatry right for me. ?

Tele-psychiatry is favorable for people who want to see a particular provider but are limited by location, weather conditions, access to childcare, or who need specialist treatment . If you travel for work, if you simply dislike traveling to appointments and doctors’ waiting rooms, or you need evening or weekend appointments, tele-psychiatry may be right for you .
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office visits available on request, book online or call 1800-222-GABA

GABA Telepsychiatry

See your US qualified and licensed psychiatrist from anywhere in the word via our encrypted video platform.See the psychiatrist of your choice from the comfort of your own home. Schedule at your own convenience. We are open evenings, nights  and weekends. Our cloud based scheduling software facilitates same day appointments. Highest standards of professional/ethical Telepsychiatry Practices. No more traffic jams, sick days, waiting rooms. Stop missing appointments when travelling. Private, discreet concierge service. Individuals, Couples therapy and Family therapy services. Prescriptions sent directly to your local pharmacy. Medications forwarded to your location. All you need is a computer and an internet access. Same day Appointments. Book now!


Phychiatry Made Easy

Traditionally, patients would travel sometimes for hours to see a doctor. If unable to attend their appointment, they will still be charged for the visit. Patients would have to use up their sick days or take time away from their business to attend appointments. It was hard to find a doctor on evenings or weekends. People who travelled for work or took long summer vacations would have to miss appointments and would have trouble obtaining prescriptions. We make sure that we do not punish patients for having a productive and full life and our goal is to provide high quality treatment for everyone, regardless of their lifestyle or location.